How good are you at ‘X’?

Where X can be basically any task. Likely your answer is that you are pretty good at X. In fact, you probably think you are above average. There is an explanation for this: the Dunning-Kruger effect. This is a bias where people generally believe they are better at a task than they are. This effect…

Academic Health Economists’ Blog Journal Round-Up

Today I put together the journal round-up for the Academic Health Economists’ blog, one of my favorite reads. I review three papers: Understanding price growth in the market for targeted oncology therapies. American Journal of Managed Care [PubMed] Published 14th June 2019 Do cancer treatments have option value? Real‐world evidence from metastatic melanoma. Health Economics [PubMed]…

Is Uber a substitute for ambulances?

According to a paper by Moskatel and Slutsky (2019), the answer appears to be ‘yes’. In this paper, we ask whether UberX’s entry into a city caused substitution away from traditional ambulances for low‐risk patients, reducing overall volume. Using a city‐panel over‐time and leverage that UberX enter markets sporadically over multiple years, we find that…

Open-Source Publishing

An interesting new approach to academic article publishing as described by Josh Cohen from Tufts University: Open-peer review journals preserve scientific review by conducting reviews after the article’s initial release. Review takes place in the open, with comments and the peer reviewer’s name published online, along with the article authors’ responses and revised manuscript, and…

How to measure preferences in health

Which treatment is the best?  This is a seemingly simple question, but there are many answers.  Some people would say whatever the clinical evidence says.  Others would contend that patient preferences are paramount and patient preferences should rule the day.  In our current world of health care largely paid for by insurance, how should the preferences…