Does Increased Hospital Spending Reduce Mortality?

According to Romley, Jena and Goldman (2011), the answer is yes. For each of 6 diagnoses at admission—acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, acute stroke, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, hip fracture, and pneumonia—patient admission to higher-spending hospitals was associated with lower risk-adjusted inpatient mortality. During 1999 to 2003, for example, patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction to…

How Medicare Measures Hospital Quality

There are many ways that Medicare evaluates hospital quality. Medicare conducts patient surveys (i.e,. HCAHPS). Medicare has hospitals report a variety of process of care measures through the Inpatient Quality Report (IQR) Program. Medicare uses data that Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) collects via the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) tool to measure…

The Effect of Hospital Consolidation on Prices and Quality

An interesting report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation summarizes the literature describing the effect of hospital concentration in a market on prices and quality.  The general consensus from the literature is the following: Increases in hospital market concentration lead to increases in the price of hospital care Hospital mergers in concentrated markets generally lead…

Hospitals as Hotels

More evidence: “One patient who gave the hospital low satisfaction scores, particularly on room cleanliness, was contacted to explain why, [Jim] McManus [vice president of finance at St. Joseph’s Health system in Southern California] said. It wasn’t that the room was dirty, the patient replied. He wanted the cleaning schedule to mirror a hotel experience—cleaned…