Vaccines provide good value for money in low- and middle-income countries

That is according to a Health Affairspaper by So Yoon Sim et al. (2020). We estimated economic benefits using cost-of-illness and value-of-a-statistical-life approaches and combined this estimation with immunization program costs to derive the return on investment from immunization programs against ten pathogens for ninety-four low- and middle-income countries for the period 2011–30. Using the…

Polio eradicated in Africa?

Some positive news as reported in The Economist: On August 21st Nigeria marked three years since its last documented case of wild polio. That means the country is set to be declared polio-free by the World Health Organisation-backed Global Polio Eradication Initiative. If that happens, probably next year, all of Africa will be officially free…

Parents and Vaccinations

No, this story is not about parents who don’t vaccinate their kids.  It’s about parents who have vaccinated their kids (or plan to), but want to keep their children away from unvaccinated children.  From the LA Times: A Bay Area mother formed a Facebook page where parents could arrange play dates for their children with…

Paying poor people to get vaccinated

Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) programs have become very popular among development economists.  This programs pay poor families to have their children attend school and/or get vaccinated.  Some of the larger programs include Bolsa Família in Brazil and Oportunidades in Mexico.   Should economists support CCTs that pay the poor to get vaccinated?  This depends on 2 factors: 1)…

Vaccination rate overstated

The Washington Post reports that the number of children who have been vaccinated in developing countries has been greatly exaggerated.  Political pressure to increase vaccination rates as well as financial incentives from NGOs rewarded increased vaccinations has driven these reporting errors.  Hat Tip: Marginal Revolution.